NFC Notes: Kaepernick, Ward, Saints

More is coming out about Colin Kaepernick‘s collusion lawsuit against the NFL. Kaepernick’s lawyer, Mark Geragos, recently shed some light about some of the points they will attempt to prove that collusion exists between the NFL owners in the latest episode of his Reasonable Doubt podcast. Geragos pointed out the need for a “smoking gun” that proves there is coordinated effort from owners from blocking his client from signing with a franchise. In response to a question about a potential email regarding the collusion from Roger Goodell, Geragos stated “there is very good reason to believe that that exists,” the lawyer said (transcription via Pro Football Talk). “The interesting thing will be when the discovery comes, and I expect the discovery to be very quickly.” Even with the confidence coming from the lawyer, the overall sentiment around the case is that collusion will be a difficult charge to prove, but it looks like Kaepernick and his team are serious about their lawsuit and will look far and wide to see if any hard evidence exists.

Here’s more from the NFC:

  • New Buccaneers safety T.J. Ward is apparently frustrated with his part-time defensive role, according to Rick Stroud of the Tampa Bay Times. The reporter passes along that the veteran defensive back is at his “wits end” in regards to his role on the team. Ward was not on the field during Tampa Bay’s fourth quarter collapse at the hands of the Bills. The 30 year-old expected to bring more physicality when he signed a one-year, $4MM deal with the team after he was cut by the Broncos in the preseason. Ward only has 11 total tackles on the year and looks to be on his way out of the rotation after what transpired today.
  • Saints linebacker Hau’oli Kikaha could be on the trading block after his deactivation from today’s contest vs. the Packers, Larry Holder of NOLA.com speculates (Twitter link). It’s a disappointing turn of events for the former 2015 third round pick, who was benched in favor of defensive lineman Al-Quadin Muhammad. However, despite Kikaha’s struggles, the Saints defense has turned the corner in recent weeks, getting another takeaway today, after notching five turnovers last Sunday.
  • In other Saints news, we have now learned that the team’s former veteran cornerback Brandon Browner was arrested for cocaine possession last May, reports Amos Moralle III of NOLA.com. Browner last appeared for the team in 2015, but was mostly ineffective with the team deciding to move on from the defensive back that following offseason.
View Comments (17)
newest oldest

17 comments on “NFC Notes: Kaepernick, Ward, Saints

  1. mcase7187

    If there really is this big conspiracy to not hire Kap then the NFL looks really bad I i for one would love to see there reasoning for it and what owners are really pushing for it

    If it’s because the guy chose to protest like he did then that’s just BS they have had payers who beat their wives and children and have done a lot of other things 100% worse than that I personally don’t like or agree with the kneeling during the anthem but it’s his right people with commonsense know it has nothing to do with the military it’s about equality for everyone

    0
    0
  2. mcdusty31

    You know what? Now that I think about it, these guys should’ve hired me too…I wonder how I can contact the lawyer and get in on this

    0
    0
  3. qbass187

    Am I remembering something that never happened? But, did the Seahawks offer Kapernick and opportunity to compete for the backup position? With Kapernick turning it down because he though he was worth more $$ than they were offering.

    0
    0
    • frankthetank1985

      EXACTLY! he is a backup quality player who wanted starter money and is a diva. Teams can go elsewhere and have. And his behavior since hasn’t helped his cause. Done. Nothing more than that. And the negative circus hat has ensued this year, no gm wants to add to that. Ratings are down. Not that I agree, but having past domestic abusers or felons doesn’t keep much viewership away, but this anti patriotism/the world is against black people stuff (or in this divas opinion – all cops are bad and pigs) has obviously hurt ratings. Why bother over paying for a backup that will only hurt ratings and viewership.

      0
      0
  4. SixGuns

    Jim Brown was also an “activist” but (a) he was great; and (b) he quit the game to fully embrace his role as an activist. He is now admired for doing so. Perhaps Mr Kaepernick should have taken a history lesson

    0
    0
    • mafiaso316

      Exactly,,, and that is why Jim Brown is Highly Respected and a True Hall of Famer!!!!

      0
      0
      • OCTraveler

        And if you take the time to check, you will see that the same Jim Brown agrees with Kapernick’s viewpoint. Brown goes on to say he would have chosen a different means of protest, but regardless of this Kapernick has the right to protest in anyway he chooses as long as it is not illegal or violent. Kapernick is simply following the leas of other socially intolerant Black athletes such as Brown, Muhammad Ali, Tommy Smith, John Carlos and Dr. Harry Edwards.

        0
        0
    • LA Sam

      He quit because Browns didn’t match his desired salary….so he took his ball and became an actor. It’s hard to remember all the Oscar wins….I know.

      0
      0
  5. OCTraveler

    Not sure what you mean, but if it wasn’t for individuals expressing themselves against injustice, we all might still be English citizens. Hey wait a second, with all the insanity and stupidity in Washington, maybe it would have better to stay a part of the Commonwealth.

    0
    0
    • cubfanbudman1953

      You do understand that the 2nd Amendment says government shall not limit speech, that does not apply to an employer. If I am an owner and I say stand during the National Anthem or you will be fired then you will stand or be fired.

      0
      0
  6. OCTraveler

    “yessir master” or maybe “thank you – may I have another” – employers have the rights to make rules for employees while they are working not to violate their personal rights. This is no different than an employer sexually harassing an employee or an employer denying the right of an employee to wear some clothing that pertains to their religious or cultural. Bias is simply bias anyway you look at it.

    0
    0

Leave a Reply