Aaron Rodgers To Push For New Deal?

The latest polarizing free agent likely set to cash in due to the quarterback position’s supply-and-demand state, Mike Glennon could have an effect on how the player many perceive as the game’s best passer proceeds. Seeing Glennon in line to sign for as much as $15MM per year, Aaron Rodgers said that situation “has to” lead to a revisiting of his own deal with the Packers, per Jason Wilde of ESPNWisconsin.com (on Twitter). Rodgers, though, downplayed this perceived desire for a pay bump (via Twitter).

Rodgers is no longer the league’s highest-paid signal-caller, with Andrew Luck now occupying that status. In fact, Rodgers’ $22MM-per-year setup has slunk to fourth on this list in terms of AAV — also behind Drew Brees and Joe Flacco. The 33-year-old perennial MVP candidate is signed through the 2019 season and will count $20.3MM, $20.9MM and $21.1MM in those years.

However, several other quarterbacks look to be in line to surpass Rodgers’ salary via likely 2017 extensions. Matt Ryan, Matthew Stafford and Derek Carr, and possibly Kirk Cousins, figure to sign for more than $22MM per year. Rodgers could be reacting to this as much as Glennon being set to follow in Brock Osweiler‘s footsteps.

Rodgers signed his five-year, $110MM extension in 2013. He bounced back from a substandard (for him) year by leading the NFL with 40 touchdown passes and guiding the Packers to their eighth straight playoff berth after the team began the season 4-6. The longtime starter’s virtuoso playoff work led the Packers past the Giants and Cowboys in January.

Going into the 2017 season, Rodgers figures to have several years left to contribute to Green Bay’s championship cause. He discussed playing into his 40s early during the 2016 season, which was the former first-rounder’s 12th in the league. Among active quarterbacks, Rodgers’ two MVPs are also tied with Tom Brady — in six fewer seasons as a full-time starter — for most in football, so he figures to have a case for a raise should he bring this up to Packers management.

Photo courtesy of USA Today Sports Images.

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8 comments on “Aaron Rodgers To Push For New Deal?

  1. vltrophy

    If I were in Rodgers shoes I’d want more as well. But which is more important? Another ring or being the highest pd QB? Packers could use that money to get better FA’s then when the Packers win another Super Bowl Rodgers has more reasons to want more money

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    • Adam

      The Packers avoid free agents like the plague. That’s the least likely way they’d use that money. Rodgers has also been frustrated in the past by their failure to show much interest in using free agency to improve key areas of the club, so this move by him might be as much due to their inaction in free agency as his desire to be up the QB compensation list. More or less his way of saying “if you’re not willing to bring in players and want to put this all on my back, then you need to pay me for that”

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      • Velmert

        Exactly. It’s not like TT is gonna use the money. Davon House?

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  2. sufferfortribe
    sufferfortribe

    Exactly why is Luck the highest paid QB? Does it have anything to do with his name?

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    • JT19

      Maybe because he took the Colts to 11-5 records in his first three seasons? Or because his numbers were good those three seasons?

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  3. t53g

    Mr Rogers needs to quit whining ! That last play off game he cried to the refs the whole game.Hes not worth any more money . Greedy #$%^##@

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    • 11Bravo

      Greedy? When he could be wanting to be paid what he’s worth? When there are QBs like Carr, Stanford, and Cousins set to surpass him in pay? You must be a Vikings fan. Or a Cowboys fan. And if you’re going to rip him, at least spell his name right.

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  4. He signed a contract. Period. The fact others will surpass him in pay is irrelevant.

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