Landon Collins

Giants S Landon Collins Facing 4-6 Month Recovery

Giants safety Landon Collins is facing a four-to-six month recovery once he undergoes surgery for a partially torn labrum, according to Paul Schwartz of the New York Post (Twitter link).

That timeline isn’t a problem for Collins’ ability to play in 2019, as he should easily be able to return to the field before training camp begins. But Collins’ recovery could impact his upcoming free agency, as interested clubs could express concern about his health next spring. Given his four-to-six month projection, Collins almost certainly won’t be fully healthy when the free agent market opens in March.

Although they haven’t talked about a new contract for Collins, the Giants still seemingly have every intention on keeping him in their 2019 plans. Adam Schefter of ESPN.com reported lat month that New York will deploy the franchise tag on Collins next spring if it fails to ink him to a long-term agreement. Collins, who if healthy could have aimed to top Eric Berry‘s $13MM annual average (the highest among safeties), can be retained via the franchise tag at a one-year cost of ~$12MM.

If the Giants reverse course and don’t use the franchise tag on Collins (and don’t come together on an extension), he’d be entering a free agent market that includes a stellar crop of available safeties. The safety market, of course, was incredibly stagnant this past offseason, and Collins would be hitting free agent alongside options such as Earl ThomasHa Ha Clinton-DixLamarcus JoynerAdrian Amos, and the group of safeties that were forced to ink one-year deals in 2018 (Tre BostonEric ReidKenny VaccaroGeorge Iloka, and Tyrann Mathieu).

Given all the factors working against Collins — his health, the overloaded safety market — it shouldn’t be a surprise if he inks a one-year, “pillow” contract in order to re-establish his value. If Collins isn’t able to pass a physical by the time free agency opens, it might be best for him to accept some level of financial security and hope he can land a larger contract in 2020, when he’ll still be only 26 years old.

Collins, a second-round pick in the 2015 draft, has been a full-time starter for the Giants since entering the league. A two-time Pro Bowler, Collins posted 96 tackles, four passes defensed, and a forced fumble this season while grading as the NFL’s 36th-best safety, per Pro Football Focus.

Photo courtesy of USA Today Sports Images.

Giants To Place Landon Collins On IR

Landon Collins‘ season is over. The Giants safety will undergo surgery on his injured shoulder next week, ruling him out for the remainder of the season (Twitter link via Josina Anderson of ESPN.com). 

Publicly, the Giants are leaving open the possibility that Collins can return this year. When asked about Collins on Wednesday morning, head coach Pat Shurmur admitted that Collins will “most likely” require an operation, but did not say that it was a certainty. Unfortunately, a 2018 return for Collins is simply not an option.

Collins is scheduled to reach free agency in March, but the Giants reportedly plan to keep him from the open market with the franchise tag if they two sides cannot agree to an extension. Last month, Collins said the Giants have yet to contact him about a new deal with him and questioned the team’s desire to re-sign him in the wake of midseason trade rumors.

Collins, a second-round pick in the 2015 draft, has been a full-time starter for the Giants since entering the league. A two-time Pro Bowler, Collins has 67 tackles, four passes defensed, and a forced fumble this season while grading as the NFL’s 36th-best safety, per Pro Football Focus. For what it’s worth, PFF had Collins as the No. 13 ranked safety in the league through Week 9.

Photo courtesy of USA Today Sports Images.

Giants S Landon Collins Hasn’t Discussed Extension

The Giants have yet to engage in extension negotiations with pending free agent safety Landon Collins, as he explained to Ryan Dunleavy of NJ.com. Collins admitted to Ralph Vacchiano of SNY that he’s not sure the Giants even want to re-sign him after he was dangled in trade talks last week.

“It surprised the hell out of me,” Collins said of being mentioned in trade rumors. “It was a big eye-opener. If they’re rebuilding, they can rebuild without me. And I’m so young still, but they could still try to find younger and put the money elsewhere, into whatever they need to put it into to rebuild their team.”

New York dealt both defensive tackle Damon Harrison and cornerback Eli Apple prior to last week’s trade deadline, but ultimately held onto Collins despite reported interest from multiple clubs. The Giants were looking for a second-round pick in exchange for the 24-year-old defensive back, and while the Chiefs, Packers, and 49ers all inquired on Collins’ availability, none were apparently willing to meet Big Blue’s asking price.

Although they haven’t talked about a new contract for Collins, the Giants still seemingly have every intention on keeping him in their 2019 plans. Adam Schefter of ESPN.com reported earlier this week that New York will deploy the franchise tag on Collins next spring if it fails to ink him to a long-term agreement. Collins, who will almost surely aim to top Eric Berry‘s $13MM annual average (the highest among safeties) in 2019, could be retained via the franchise tag at a one-year cost of ~$12MM, but he won’t be pleased if New York does opt to use that tender, as he told Vacchiano.

“Honestly I don’t want it,” Collins said of the tag. “I know what type of player I am. I’m going to bring forth hard-work, talent, play-making abilities to the game each and every week. Why would I want to play under a one-year deal? If something happens I’m not guaranteed. And even though I’m guaranteed that for a year, I’m still not guaranteed.”

If the Giants reverse course and don’t use the franchise tag on Collins (and don’t come together on an extension), he’d be entering a free agent market that includes a stellar crop of available safeties. The safety market, of course, was incredibly stagnant this past offseason, and Collins would be hitting free agent alongside options such as Earl Thomas, Ha Ha Clinton-Dix, Lamarcus Joyner, Adrian Amos, and the group of safeties that were forced to ink one-year deals in 2018 (Tre Boston, Eric Reid, Kenny Vaccaro, George Iloka, and Tyrann Mathieu).

Collins, a second-round pick in the 2015 draft, has been a full-time starter for the Giants since entering the league. A two-time Pro Bowler, Collins has 62 tackles, four passes defensed, and a forced fumble this season while grading as the NFL’s 13th-best safety, per Pro Football Focus.

Photo courtesy of USA Today Sports Images.

Giants Likely To Franchise S Landon Collins

The Giants are likely to use the franchise tag on safety Landon Collins if the two sides don’t work out an extension, according to Adam Schefter of ESPN.com.

Collins was available prior to last Tuesday’s trade deadline, but the asking price was high, as the Giants were reportedly seeking a second-round pick in exchange for the All-Pro defensive back. Despite that price tag, New York did receive interest in Collins, and Schefter reports the Packers, Chiefs, and 49ers all made inquiries.

Kansas City would have made sense as a destination for Collins, as the Chiefs nearly dealt for fellow safety Earl Thomas before he went down with a season-ending injury. Green Bay, of course, traded its own safety in Ha Ha Clinton-Dix, but is still squarely in contention and in need of secondary help. The 49ers aren’t going to make the postseason, but they could have acquired Collins with the intention of using their exclusive negotiating window to hammer out a long-term deal.

As Schefter notes, all three of those clubs would presumably have interest in Collins if he hits the open market, but it doesn’t sound as though the Giants will allow that to happen. Given his age (Collins will be 25 years old when free agency opens) and pedigree, Collins will surely target a $10-12MM annual salary on his next contract. The 2019 franchise tag for safeties will be worth roughly that same amount, but wouldn’t come with the long-term risk of an extension.

Collins, a second-round pick in the 2015 draft, has been a full-time starter for the Giants since entering the league. A two-time Pro Bowler, Collins has 62 tackles, four passes defensed, and a forced fumble this season while grading as the NFL’s 13th-best safety, per Pro Football Focus.

Photo courtesy of USA Today Sports Images.

Giants Getting Trade Offers For Landon Collins

The Giants have already shown a willingness to be active in the trade market, shipping out Damon Harrison and Eli Apple for draft picks over the past week. New York has clearly thrown in the towel on 2018, and is focused on building draft capital for the future. It was reported earlier today that they were receiving “decent offers” for Odell Beckham, and now another good young player is apparently garnering offers. 

The Giants have received multiple trade offers for safety Landon Collins, a source told Ralph Vacchiano of SNY. While Collins is still only 24, it’s apparently a very real possibility that the Giants decide to move him, and some league executives “believe they might be willing to move him if they receive a second-day pick (Rounds 2 and 3) in the 2019 NFL Draft”, according to Vacchiano.

Collins is in the final year of his rookie deal, and should be in line for a huge payday in free-agency. It was reported this summer that the team had concerns about how well Collins would fit their new defensive scheme, so it wouldn’t be shocking if they decide they don’t want to hand him a massive deal this offseason. If they’re going to let him walk anyway, it would make sense to trade him if they could get a good pick.

Collins, the 33rd pick of the 2015 draft, was a first-team All-Pro in 2016 and has made the Pro Bowl twice. Through 54 career games, Collins has 389 tackles, eight interceptions, and 32 passes defended.

Photo courtesy of USA Today Sports Images.

Extra Points: Steelers, Bell, Giants, OBJ, Collins, Dolphins, Quinn

Le’Veon Bell appears likely to again remain away from the Steelers all summer. Similarly to last year, he’s expected to show up right before the regular season as he angles for a longterm extension that will make him the highest paid running back in league history.

Until he shows up, Bell won’t be signing his franchise tender. That’s in contrast to the other players who’ve been tagged such as Lamarcus Joyner, Demarcus Lawrence, and Ezekiel Ansah, who have all signed their tenders. If there’s no progress on a longterm deal and the relationship between the two sides sour, the Steelers could even rescind Bell’s tender before he signs it and play the 2018 season without him, says Mike Florio of ProFootballTalk.com. While Florio says that option “remains unlikely”, he thinks it’s a possibility and notes it would put Bell in a “tough spot” as most teams’ salary caps and rosters would be set by then.

It’s a long-shot, but the Steelers seem to think they need Bell less than everyone else. Crazier things have happened.

Here’s more from around the league:

East Notes: Jets, Enunwa, Giants, Collins

With free agency on the horizon, Jets wide receiver Quincy Enunwa has a lot to prove, Manish Mehta of the Daily News writes. In 2016, Eric Decker‘s season-ending injury opened up the door for Enunwa and he made the most of his opportunity as he led the Jets in receiving yards (857) and touchdowns (four) and finished second in receptions (58) and targets (105). However, he was lost for the 2017 season when he aggravated a neck injury over the summer.

Now, Enunwa has returned to find a crowded wide receiver room, albeit one with plenty of question marks. Enunwa figures to stay involved thanks to his big 6’2″ frame and run blocking ability, but as Mehta points out, he’ll have to curtail his drops. In 2016, Enunwa’s 12 drops were the second most in the NFL, even as he led the league in catch rate on deep targets.

If Enunwa can stay healthy and hang on to more of the balls that hit his hands, he could be on the path to riches in 2019, whether it’s with the Jets or with a different club.

Here’s more from the East divisions:

  • What will it cost for the Giants to lock up safety Landon Collins? Ryan Dunleavy of NJ.com spoke with former agent Joel Corry and cap expert Jason Fitzgerald to get an idea of what a new contract might cost. Corry estimated that Collins’ camp will seek no less $12MM per year, while Fitzgerald posited that a fair deal would call for $62MM over five years ($12.4MM/year) with between $35MM and $37MM guaranteed. For now, Collins is due to make $1.2MM in 2018, the final year of his rookie contract.
  • Bo Wulf of The Athletic took a stab at predicting the Eagles‘ 53-man roster for Week 1. In his estimation, there are 38 players that have already punched their ticket, leaving 15 spots up for grabs. Interestingly, Wulf picks UDFA running back Josh Adams to come away with the No. 4 RB spot, ahead of 2017 fourth-rounder Donnel Pumphrey, Wendell Smallwood, and Matt Jones. The Eagles, in theory, could carry a fifth running back, but Wulf expects them to allocate that roster spot elsewhere.
  • The Dolphins recently conducted a private interview with Virginia Tech cornerback Adonis Alexander, according to a source who spoke with Barry Jackson of the Miami Herald. Miami also attended Alexander’s Pro Day, so he could be a real consideration for the team in next week’s supplemental draft.

NFC Notes: Collins, Giants, Chancellor, Seahawks, Panthers

In a recent column, Geoff Mosher of Thescore.com talked about Giants All-Pro safety Landon Collins, how he’ll adjust to new defensive coordinator James Bettcher‘s scheme, and how it might impact Collins’ potential contract extension.

Mosher writes that since Bettcher blitzes heavily, his scheme will require Collins to play a lot of man coverage, something that isn’t his strong suit. Mosher opines that the Giants may decide Collins isn’t as impactful as he once was in the new scheme, and that they don’t want to pay him top-safety dollar, around $12-13MM annually, when his contract expires after this year.

Mosher notes that the Giants will want to see how Collins adapts to the change in his role throughout the offseason but says “the longer the Giants wait, the more they risk Collins opting to test free agency.” It’ll be interesting to watch how this plays out, and if the Giants opt not to lock Collins up, he’ll be one of the biggest names on the market in March of 2019.

Here’s more from around the NFC:

  • The Seahawks “don’t appear to be counting” on Kam Chancellor to play this season, according to Bob Condotta of the Seattle Times. Chancellor has insisted that he wants to play, but Condotta doesn’t think doctors will be able to clear Chancellor from his neck injury. The Seahawks have already lost many pieces of their formerly legendary defense, and it looks like Chancellor will be the next to go, as Condotta notes the Seahawks have already made “aggressive” moves to replace Chancellor at safety.
  • Wide receiver D.J. Moore, the 24th overall pick by the Panthers, still hasn’t signed. He’s likely holding out for all four years of his contract to be guaranteed, writes Joseph Person of the Charlotte Observer. Person thinks Moore is waiting to see what Isaiah Wynn, taken one pick before Moore, gets from the Patriots before signing his deal.
  • Person thinks locking up offensive tackle Daryl Williams to an extension is a “priority” for the team. Person writes that he’d “be mildly surprised if general manager Marty Hurney doesn’t get a deal done by the start of the season” for the top-flight tackle who played every offensive snap for the team last season.

East Rumors: Collins, Fins, Bills, Lauvao

Landon Collins has yet to practice with the Giants this offseason. He underwent a second surgery on the forearm he broke late last season. The latest operation delayed the fourth-year safety’s timetable, but he’s hoping to be back on the field in time for Giants minicamp next month, Tom Rock of Newsday notes. Collins expects to be cleared in a few weeks, per Rock. It’s possible the Giants could hold him out until training camp, with the standout defender having essentially nothing to prove in June workouts, but the holdover Giant defenders are adjusting to James Bettcher‘s new scheme. That makes OTAs and minicamp more important than they were a year ago. However, Collins said he’s running currently and will push the new coaching staff to let him work with his teammates in a few weeks.

Here’s the latest from the East divisions:

  • Raekwon McMillan‘s 2017 injury came at a worse time than Collins’ and was far more severe. But the Dolphins linebacker is back in action. McMillan is participating in Miami’s OTAs, per Shandel Richardson of the South Florida Sun-Sentinel. The former Ohio State ‘backer and Ryan Tannehill underwent surgeries for ACL tears on the same date last summer and are each progressing accordingly. Both are working with their teammates at OTAs. McMillan was slated to be the Dolphins’ starting middle linebacker prior to his preseason setback.
  • The Redskins opted to bring back veteran guard Shawn Lauvao for what will be a fifth season with the team, doing so possibly because of Arie Kouandjio‘s significant injury. Lauvao’s deal will be a one-year pact worth up to $2.39MM, John Keim of ESPN.com reports (on Twitter). The 30-year-old lineman will earn $950K in base salary, per Keim, who adds this agreement includes a $300K signing bonus and a $200K roster bonus. While only $300K is guaranteed, Keim categorizes the $1MM incentive package as “likely to be earned.”
  • After being benched early last season, John Miller is back working as the Bills‘ first-unit right guard, Joe Buscaglia of WKBW notes. Departures of Richie Incognito, Eric Wood and Cordy Glenn have the Bills’ line in an interesting place, but Miller has started all 32 games in which he’s played since Buffalo used a third-round pick on him in 2015. Vlad Ducasse usurped him after the guards’ offseason competition, which Miller won, continued into the regular season. Miller did not see action after this post-Week 4 demotion, but Buffalo is giving him another chance entering his contract year. If Miller sticks at right guard, Ducasse would be in line to fill Incognito’s left guard position.

East Notes: Giants, Collins, Pats, Dolphins

Landon Collins fractured his arm last December, and the injury is not healing as well as the Giants safety had hoped, reprots Mike Garafolo of NFL.com (Twitter links). As such, Collins is now considering another operation to further repair the break. Luckily, a procedure to plate the break would only recover a six-to-eight week recovery period, meaning Collins would likely be available for training camp, per Garafolo, who cautions that while surgery is expected, no final decision has been made. Collins, who earned his second consecutive Pro Bowl berth in 2017, is entering the final year of his rookie contract.

Here’s more from the NFL’s two East divisions:

  • After missing the entirety of his rookie season due to a torn ACL, Patriots edge rusher Derek Rivers has not suffered any setbacks, per Mike Reiss of ESPN.com. As should be expected, New England will likely use caution as Rivers reintegrates into football, and the club likely won’t feel the need to push Rivers during offseason activities. But it appears that the third-round pick from Youngstown State will be ready for the start of the 2018 campaign, says Reiss. Heading into last year’s draft, Rivers was viewed as something of a project, a high-motor player who may need time to develop. The Patriots could certainly use help on the edge after finishing just 30th in pressure rate last year, and Rivers could conceivably get a chance at playing time if healthy.
  • Although the Dolphins have already signed veteran Frank Gore to pair with incumbent Kenyan Drake, the club will be open to selecting another running back in the draft, as Barry Jackson of the Miami Herald writes. Indeed, Miami has been attempting to schedule a pre-draft visit with San Diego State running back Rashaad Penny, but finding an open date has been difficult given that Penny has already set up many meetings with other teams. Penny (5’11”, 220) rushed for a whopping 2,248 yards in 2018, averaging 7.8 yards per carry while scoring 23 touchdowns on the ground.
  • The New York media market could play a factor in the Giants‘ decision on whether to use the No. 2 overall pick on quarterback, Mike Florio of Pro Football Talk opines. If Big Blue drafts a signal-caller, fans and reporters alike will likely be clamoring for that passer to be inserted into the starting lineup if Eli Manning falters. While that doesn’t necessarily mean the Giants shouldn’t consider a quarterback, they should only do so if general manager Dave Gettleman & Co. have no doubts about the prospect, argues Florio. Sitting at No. 2, New York will have their choice of three of Sam Darnold, Josh Rosen, Baker Mayfield, and Josh Allen (provided Cleveland uses the first overall pick on a quarterback, as expected).